Budgies in winter [Archive] - Talk Budgies Forums

: Budgies in winter


Pitchii☆
08-30-2008, 12:55 AM
Summer has finished shockingly early this year. Nights are getting really cool, in fact last night we were cold :eek:

My two other budgies I had in New Zealand where a thicker cover was all that was needed for winter.

Now I'm in the mountains of Japan and it gets pretty cold in winter. Usually it snows but last year was freakishly mild (global warming!?). Since it's turning cold here so early I'm worried it's going to be a super cold winter.

Those of you in cold climates how do you keep your little ones warm? While I'm at home it should be no problem but I'm worried about when I'll be out of the house or at night (while sleeping) when we usually don't keep the heat on (a/c). I've seen heaters for cages, do you use them?

Cinnamonroll
08-30-2008, 01:06 AM
I live in Canada but last winter went by with no problems without me having to do anything special. I do have the heat on in my room though, but I think as long as the temperature lowers gradually, the budgie will get use to it. Make sure not to place the cage in way of any drafts though~

BudgieBudgie
08-30-2008, 01:39 AM
I use a heating lamp (ceramic -- it produces no light!) with a thermostat OR a small room heater next to the cage (but it can heat up the whole room) with a thermostat. I always keep it on low, even overnight, so the birds don't get cold even if the house does. It saves heating the whole house.

BUUZBEE
08-30-2008, 01:42 AM
We use ceramic heat lamps in the winter for the aviary birds :)

Kate C
08-30-2008, 01:46 AM
I find you are better off to have a room that is not heated. Unless you have central heating there should not be a problem. Make sure the room is not a bathroom, laundry or garage. Keep your birds in there and they should acclimatise to the cooler weather. A sun room is great as they will get warmth from the sun on the windows, just don't keep them right next to the glass as the radiant heat would be too much even in winter. The same goes for cooling. As I can't afford air conditioning and just have a couple of fans going the birds have no problem. With heating with the cost of electricity and at the moment I only have an electric heater to use and then not on all three bars my inside birds cope quite well. Mind you our temperatures here are probably not that bad but we have had a number of days this year that were officially -3 which means it was probably closer to -5 and believe me my house is not that much warmer than that inside. My outside birds tend to cope very well with the changes of weather as it happens gradually. We have had ranges from -8 in winter up to 50 plus in summer so it is a big range of temperature. They seem to cope ok in England even with snow the birds have outside flights but are locked into indoor flights when it cools down.

Budgietom
08-30-2008, 01:48 AM
It does get a tad cold down here but not as cold as Japan or Canada.

Actually Pamela Anderson (who won't leave Australia) was on TV on thursday. She said "Like Oh my god, I can't believe you guys have a winter. I thought it was always hot in Australia". Yess Pammy, we do have a winter :D

Evee climatised to the winter. I didn't do anyhting at all (except for the blanket over cage at night) :)

Pitchii☆
08-30-2008, 02:26 AM
I feel like I should get something as sometimes it's so cold you can see your own breath - inside the house.
Did a bit of browsing and found this - It's reasonably priced and attaches to the cage. It's ceramic.
http://img401.imageshack.us/img401/3914/heatervh5.jpg

Thinking about getting it just in case. :)

Budgietom
08-30-2008, 02:29 AM
What is it, I can't read Japanese :D ;)

Goldielover
08-30-2008, 08:25 AM
I don't have to do anything special for the winter. Like most Canadian homes, and especially ones in the colder parts of the country, my building has central heating. It never goes below 20C inside, even when it is -20C outside. The feral felines love the baseboard heater that runs full length in the living room - it is quite common to see all three of them stretched out along it in a row.:) With regards to Midge, the main thing I have to watch out for is icy cold drafts if I open the balcony slider to get a breath of fresh air. I just make sure not to leave it open. She doesn't even appear to notice the change of seasons.

BudgieBudgie
08-30-2008, 02:26 PM
Because budgies are from Australia, I believe it's unreasonable to expect them to acclimate to cold like Pitchii was describing, and it not pose any threat of ill effects. You wouldn't make an Italian Greyhound or Chihuahua suffer the cold? Or an African snake to acclimate to temperate weather? Their body is designed for hot temperatures. Best to imitate ideal temperatures for any species, in my opinion, for ideal health support.

BudgieBudgie
08-30-2008, 02:28 PM
I feel like I should get something as sometimes it's so cold you can see your own breath - inside the house.
Did a bit of browsing and found this - It's reasonably priced and attaches to the cage. It's ceramic.

[IMG]

Thinking about getting it just in case. :)
Does that attach to the outside of the cage?

miss parakeet
08-30-2008, 04:20 PM
yeah i agree with buuzbee,,heat lamps are a good idea

♥♥

lamagdalena
08-30-2008, 05:47 PM
yeah i agree with buuzbee,,heat lamps are a good idea

♥♥

that cactus bowl is so cute!!!


I will also face my first winter with my fids at the end of year. I am very hesitant over heat lamps, I don't want to over do it and have them be ill because of too much heat. Though I think it's not as difficult as I make it seem.

Let us know how your baby gets on during the japanese winter.

Kate C
08-30-2008, 06:50 PM
Actually in the wild in Australia there is a very wide fluctuations in temperature. In the Arid and Semi Desert areas during the day it can be well over 40c and at night it can drop down to around zero. This is a common thing in desert and semi destert areas. The biggest danger with birds is sudden drops or increases in temperature and draughts.

In my house in winter you often can see your own breath. If you have central heating you have to have it on all the time for it not to be a problem with your birds. The sudden drop when the heating is turned off can be a problem.

Goldielover
08-30-2008, 07:57 PM
Most people here do have their central heating turned on all the time from October through about April, but may set the thermostat a little lower at night. I don't think the difference is enough to upset the birds. I think the people who are going to be affected the most are those from slightly warmer climates than Canada, where central heating may not be the norm like it is here, but temperatures can still dip a bit at times. A small thermostatically controlled electric space heater in the room where the budgies are is probably a good option, but I'm always a little leery about leaving those things on when I'm not at home.

atvchick95
08-30-2008, 08:32 PM
our winter this past winter wasn't too bad (amazingly enough its normally really cold), but the birds room is one of the warmest rooms of the house all year long (no doubt because of all the windows) but I kept a thermostat in the room and If i walked in and I was cold - I knew it was cold for them, So we got a small electric heater (it's a older one, if it gets knocked over it automatically shuts off - I'm looking for more As gas is extremely high and thats what every one round here seems to heat the houses with! but I am having trouble finding ones with auto shut offs when it gets bumped or knocked over)

but we kept our bird room at 70 degrees all winter long and they were fine.



I do have a question though - how can it be said "it's cruel to make these birds adjust to our weather" I understand yes the birds Originated in Australia - but the birds I own never stepped foot in Australia,and i'm sure their ancestors who came from Australia are so far down the line the blood from them doesn't exist in mine any more. they've been in Indiana all their life, and our weather is the wackiest around - the states saying is "if you don't like the weather stick around for a minute it'll change"

and this is true - one day this winter it was fairly decent but pouring down rain within 10 mins after the rain - I had snow within minutes of that snow fall I had a inch and a half of snow! then a few hours later it was raining again by the next morning the snow was up to the bumper of my b/f's truck

BudgieBudgie
08-30-2008, 08:48 PM
Actually in the wild in Australia there is a very wide fluctuations in temperature. In the Arid and Semi Desert areas during the day it can be well over 40c and at night it can drop down to around zero. This is a common thing in desert and semi destert areas. The biggest danger with birds is sudden drops or increases in temperature and draughts.

In my house in winter you often can see your own breath. If you have central heating you have to have it on all the time for it not to be a problem with your birds. The sudden drop when the heating is turned off can be a problem.

I totally understand that temperature drops and it gets cold in their native habitat. But does that make it an ideal temperature? Wild birds die from natural weather fluctuations. A lot of animals die in winter. (This isn't Bambi.) 'Else we'd be completely overpopulated by animals every summer.

I'm just suggesting- when you have the power to provide the healthiest environment (IMO, heating), and the answer is simple and inexpensive, why do otherwise?

BudgieBudgie
08-30-2008, 09:02 PM
I do have a question though - how can it be said "it's cruel to make these birds adjust to our weather"

Wait, who suggested it was cruel? Are you referring to my post? Did you actually read it?

I suggested that there could be some ill effects to budgies being kept in an unideal environment. Like, they could catch colds more easily. Same as us...?

I understand yes the birds Originated in Australia - but the birds I own never stepped foot in Australia,and i'm sure their ancestors who came from Australia are so far down the line the blood from them doesn't exist in mine any more. they've been in Indiana all their life, and our weather is the wackiest around - the states saying is "if you don't like the weather stick around for a minute it'll change"

I don't even know where to start to reply to this. ...Unless your birds were specifically bred (/genetically altered (English?)) to adapt to a non-arid climate, their bodies are still basically the same as their wild counterpart. I'm open to the theory of adaptation via breeding the stock best suited to an artificial (temperate) environment (the animals that thrive/look best are best suited and are the ones that get bred). So maybe English are better suited, having been physically altered? I don't know. I am sure yours are doing fine in Indian weather. But they're still the same bird.

Anyway, I didn't mean to be offensive in this or my last post, but it's a peeve of mine when people swing my comments way out of line. I'll leave this thread...

Celyste
08-31-2008, 03:09 AM
This past winter, I was a bit afraid of my heating bill, so my house was at a comfy 67 deg's during the 'day' and 65 at night. The featherheads did great with it. Made sure to keep them out of drafts and not to suddenly have a warm day (yay double brick walls!). Consistency seems to be the key.

The cold in itself won't cause them any issues. Low temperature doesn't cause colds... bacteria and virii cause colds. However, you do have to feed and clean and make sure they get enough sleep time, cause if they are 'run down', then the cold will further lower their resistance and allow them to become sick easier.

Kate C
08-31-2008, 05:29 AM
I have found with my Conures that even though they have been bred in Australia and our climate is probably considered mild in winter they definitely feel the cold. Sort of inherited memory of their hotter tropical climate in their part of South America. They just don't like the cold but it can be extremely hot in the house in summer as I don't have air conditioning and they are perfectly happy and the heat does not seem to worry them at all. Because of the cold is why I keep them inside and not in an outside cage or aviary. When I have hand raised birds that I am keeping if they are not able to go outside by early autumn they then stay inside until at least the middle of September when the weather is starting to get warmer. They need time to naturally acclimatise to the colder weather that is why Gus is still inside even though he is driving me nuts. He wants to be outside with his brothers and yells back and forward to them. God I can't wait for it to get warmer so he will keep a bit quiter as he will be outside with his older brothers.

I have spoken to people over here who ring me through the Bird Breeders Info Line and tell me they have lost their bird. They keep their bird inside all through the day in a nice warm heated house and at nighttime they put them either in the bathroom, laundry or garage and wonder why they have a problem. They are picking the 3 coldest areas of the house to put the birds at night. This is what I mean by a sudden drop in temperatures for the birds. I have also seen people have problems when they have bought a bird from an air conditioned pet shop and then either put them outside in full summer or full winter and wonder why they have a problem. If I had air conditioning the birds would not be in the same room with it as the air would only be on when I am home during the day and would be turned off at night because of the cost of electricity. Unless you can afford to keep it going day and night whether you are at home or not it is best not to have the birds in the same room with it.

Pitchii☆
09-02-2008, 10:11 PM
Does that attach to the outside of the cage?

Yes. It doesn't have a thermostat though so since my cage isn't huge, I guess over heating is a worry ... but it is only 100w.

wow, conflicting answers! Got me a little confused but still leaning towards getting the heater.

Pitchii will be in the same room all the time, the living room which also acts as a bedroom at night (futon come out of the cupboard!) so no worries about being put in a drafty place at night.
I teach from home so I have no choice but to keep the room warm :p but when we go out or while we sleep I don't think we'll keep the air conditioning on so I worry about her getting stressed out from the cold at those times. So, I'm really thinking I should get that heater.
I'm worrying about this quite a lot because I lost two hamsters here from the cold. I want to do all I can from prevent it happening again with Pitchii :(